Samuel Huntington Tomb

Samuel Huntington Tomb

This tomb is the final resting place of Samuel Huntington and his wife

Plaque sponsored by Bill and Peg Stanley

Located in the Colonial Cemetery

This tomb is the final resting place of Samuel Huntington and his wife, Martha, born July 16, 1731 in what is now Scotland, Connecticut. He was self-educated and became an attorney. His first law practice was in Willimantic. He later moved to Norwich in 1861 as Norwich was more affluent.

He was a delegate from Connecticut to the Continental Congress and one of only 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence and the Articles of Confederation. He served as President of the Continental Congress from 1779-1781 and was Justice of the Connecticut Supreme Court from 1784-1785, and Governor of Connecticut from 1786 until his death, January 5, 1796.

The tomb was found to be in disrepair in 2002, and a drive led by Bill Stanley restored the tomb at a cost of $130,000 in cash and in-kind services. It was during the restoration that it was discovered Samuel Huntington actually was the first President of the United States under our first Constitution, the Articles of the Confederation which stated whoever serves as President of the Continental Congress in Congress Assembled shall also serve as President of the United States.

Samuel Huntington was President of the Continental Congress on March 1, 1781 when Maryland became the last of the 13 colonies to ratify the Articles of the Confederation. Because Samuel Huntington was then President of the Continental Congress when America became a nation for the first time he was automatically the first President of the United States under our first Constitution, the Articles of the Confederation in Congress Assembled.