Beth Jacob Community Synagogue 1979-Present

beth jacob community present

The picture of a proud Irish Mary Collins Stanley with her three boys Bill, Jim and Chick, taken over 100 years ago.

Plaque sponsored by the Norwich Hebrew Home For the Aged

Located on 400 New London Turnpike

For 50 years this United Synagogue of America Congregation (conservative movement) resided on Church Street in downtown Norwich. In 1975 a new secular administration was elected on a platform that it was time to relocate. The geographic dispersion of the congregation indicated a need to move closer to residential clusters and the needs of the congregation’s activities begged for less, but more flexible space.

Between 1975 and 1979, this successful project was undertaken. The Beth Jacob Community Synagogue moved into its new home in September 1979.

Beth Jacob Community Synagogue 1929-1979

Beth Jacob Community Synagogue 1929-1979

Plaque sponsored by the Norwich Hebrew Home For the Aged

Located on 100 Church Street

In the summer of 1929, twenty-nine Jewish families came together to found a more liberal congregation, The Norwich Jewish Community Synagogue. In 1934 the name was changed to the Beth Jacob Community Synagogue.

Principally first and second generation immigrants, from eastern Europe, these courageous Jewish pioneers wanted a more modern, American approach to their historic religion, one that would teach their children the heritage of their fathers while blending more seamlessly into the American landscape.

The new Conservative Jewish movement afforded this with its mixed seating of men and women, services in a blend of English and Hebrew, and sermons in English.

By 1979 the old church building was visibly worn and the congregation built a new home at 400 New London Turnpike.

The Brothers of Joseph Synagogue

The Brothers of Joseph

The picture of a proud Irish Mary Collins Stanley with her three boys Bill, Jim and Chick, taken over 100 years ago.

Plaque sponsored by the Norwich Hebrew Home For the Aged

Located on 2 Broad Street

The Congregation was founded by Russian immigrant Jews in 1883, who unlike other predecessors, insisted all secular proceedings would be in Yiddish. A burial society was formed the same year. In 1884, the name Brothers of Joseph was adopted.

In 1898 their first permanent synagogue was built on West Main Street, The synagogue’s first rabbi, in circa 1895, was Joseph Baron, believed to be the first full time rabbi to serve in Norwich. In 1909, he was succeeded by Rabbi Joseph N. Rosenburg, who served 42 years, until his passing in 1950.

In 1964, under the spiritual leadership of Rabbi Michael D. Geller, a new house of study and worship was built on the Osgood site at the corner of Broad and Washington Streets. The congregation moved from its 1898 West Main Street home.