Silversmith & Schoolhouse on the Green

The picture of a proud Irish Mary Collins Stanley with her three boys Bill, Jim and Chick, taken over 100 years ago.

Plaque sponsored by Margot Hacker Gibbs

Located on 73 (Silversmith) & 69 (Schoolhouse) East Town Street

Once upon a time in Norwich, about 1773, Joseph Carpenter, II, a clockmaker and goldsmith, has this building constructed. It served him and his brother, Gardner, in jewelry, clocks, engravings and mercantile. It is thought to be the only remaining wooden silversmith/goldsmith structure surviving in New England.

At the close of the American Revolution, in the same year that Paris Treaty was signed, 1783, this brick schoolhouse was constructed on the Green. It was named for Dr. Daniel Lathrop who left a legacy of 500 pounds for an endowed free grammar school. Later it was occupied by the Noah Webster Literary Association and is one of the earliest brick schoolhouses still standing in the state.

The picture of a proud Irish Mary Collins Stanley with her three boys Bill, Jim and Chick, taken over 100 years ago.